Tag Archives: Beauty

Weight – Maintain it, Don’t Gain !

Maintaining a healthy weight is important for health. In addition to lowering the risk of heart disease, stroke, diabetes, and high blood pressure, it can also lower the risk of many different cancers.

Move more, eat less. Turning off the television and skipping the sugary drinks are two ways to get started.

Your weight, your waist size, and the amount of weight gained since your mid-20s can have serious health implications. These factors can strongly influence your chances of developing the following diseases and conditions:

  • Cardiovascular disease, heart attack, stroke
  • Diabetes
  • Cancer
  • Arthritis
  • Gallstones
  • Asthma
  • Cataracts
  • Infertility
  • Snoring
  • Sleep apnea

If your weight is in the healthy range and isn’t more than 10 pounds over what you weighed when you turned 21, focus on maintaining that weight by watching what you eat and exercising.

Because most adults between the ages of 18 and 49 gain 1-2 pounds each year, stopping and preventing weight gain should be a priority. Gaining weight as you age increases the chances of developing one or more chronic diseases.

Middle-aged women and men who gained 11 to 22 pounds after age 20 were up to three times more likely to develop heart disease, high blood pressure, type 2 diabetes, and gallstones than those who gained five pounds or fewer.

Those who gained more than 22 pounds had an even larger risk of developing these diseases.

Another analysis found that adult weight gain – even after menopause – can increase the risk of postmenopausal breast cancer.

Encouragingly, for women who had never used hormone replacement therapy, losing weight after menopause – and keeping it off – cut their risk of post-menopausal breast cancer in half.

Does Being Overweight Reduce Mortality?

You may have seen news coverage of a study claiming that being overweight and obese may reduce mortality but a panel of experts discussed why the general public should not rely on these flawed study findings.

The main flaw of this study is that the normal weight group, which showed an increased mortality risk compared to the overweight group, included more heavy smokers, patients with cancer or other diseases that cause weight loss, and elderly people suffering from frailty. There was no distinction made between these unhealthy normal weight people and lean healthy individuals. The overweight and obese groups did appear to have a lower mortality rate than this mix of healthy and very unhealthy normal weighted individuals, and this flaw led to false conclusions that overweight and grade 1 obesity carry no risk and may offer reduced mortality.

What Causes Weight Gain? 

  1. Diet: The quantity and quality of food in your diet has a strong impact on weight.
  2. Genes: Some people are genetically predisposed to gain weight more easily than others or to store fat around the midsection.

Genes do not have to become destiny, however, and studies suggest that eating a healthy diet, staying active, and avoiding unhealthy habits like drinking soda can prevent the genetic predisposition to risk for obesity.

  1. Physical inactivity: Exercising has a host of health benefits, including reducing the chances of developing heart disease, some types of cancer, and other chronic diseases. Physical activity is a key element of weight control and health.
  2. Sleep: Research suggests that there’s a link between how much people sleep and how much they weigh. In general, children and adults who get too little sleep tend to weigh more than those who get enough sleep.

For example, in one Study researchers followed roughly 60,000 women for 16 years. At the start of the study, all of the women were healthy, and none were obese; 16 years later, women who slept 5 hours or less per night had a 15 percent higher risk of becoming obese, compared to women who slept 7 hours per night. Short sleepers also had 30 percent higher risk of gaining 30 pounds over the course of the study, compared to women who got 7 hours of sleep per night.

There are several possible ways that sleep deprivation could increase the chances of becoming obese.

  • Sleep-deprived people may be too tired to exercise, decreasing the “calories burned” side of the weight-change equation.
  • People who don’t get enough sleep may take in more calories than those who do, simply because they are awake longer and have more opportunities to eat.
  • Lack of sleep also disrupts the balance of key hormones that control appetite, so sleep-deprived people may be hungrier than those who get enough rest each night.

What You Can Do?

Maintaining a healthy weight is not always easy. The key to success is making changes in daily eating and physical activity habits that can be maintained over one’s lifetime.

Our weight is a result of the combination of the energy one takes in (through foods and beverages) and the energy their body uses (through engaging in physical activity). To lose weight, an individual needs to use more calories than they  consume. To maintain a healthy weight, one needs to balance the calories they use with those they take in. Some ways to create a caloric deficit are:

  • Spend less time in sedentary activities (e.g., watching television, internet surfing)
  • Engage in daily physical activities (e.g., walking, bicycling, gardening, housework)
  • Eat more fruits and vegetables and reduce food portion sizes.

An interesting study has highlighted gender difference amongst people trying to reach their ideal body weight. According to a study, women tend to consider ideal weight for their height and age lesser than what is medically recommended. This forces them to resort to yo-yo diets to achieve their target. On the other hand, men tend to lean towards the higher range, and to achieve that they work on building more muscle through supplements or a high protein diet.

You can get your ideal body weight that is specific to your age, body type and lifestyle without having to starve yourself by following the balanced healthy diet and regular workout.

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What beauty means to us ?

Scientists are still trying to figure out what beauty means to people and to figure out what makes things and people beautiful. In some ways, it’s like asking whether your vision of “red” is the same as someone else’s — there’s just no way to know for sure.

Still, there’s plenty to explore in neuroscience and psychology when it comes to what people find beautiful, to what extent people see beauty in themselves, and what role beauty plays in society.

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Beauty and the brain

Regardless of culture, there appear to be certain patterns of brain activity associated with viewing something you find beautiful.

The only factor common to all that people find beautiful in art and music is activity in the brain’s medial orbital frontal cortex, part of the reward and pleasure center of the brain.

There are cultural trends in what in art and music people find beautiful — for instance, there’s a Japanese preference for asymmetry, compared to a Western ideal of symmetry. This does not apply to faces, however, as it seems that universally people prefer symmetrical faces.

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It’s also not well understood why people adapt to certain objects of beauty after many exposures, but not others. For instance, you might be bored of a pop song after a few listens, but listen to an opera dozens of times, over a period of years, and still feel emotional about it. Or perhaps there’s a painting that you’ve always admired, whereas another painting loses its splendor after a few viewings.

That makes sense, since we see every single blemish in ourselves, whereas there are plenty of people we consider beautiful to whom we don’t get close enough to examine all the little flaws. Perception of beauty may weaken when we do start to recognize those defects.

Brain imaging has been done with facial beauty, too. Self-evaluation of one’s own facial attractiveness may be related to self-esteem, based on common patterns of brain activity.

Beauty in the face

When it comes to facial attractiveness, there are reasons to believe that specific features and biologically based factors guide our assessment of beauty.

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Faces that are more symmetrical and average-looking tend to be rated as more attractive in scientific studies. Symmetry in particular has been studied extensively, not only in the Western World but also in hunter-gatherer cultures removed from mainstream media. The Hadza of Tanzania, a remote group of hunter-gatherers, showed a stronger preference for symmetry than people in the United Kingdom. Men who were more often deemed good hunters especially liked symmetry in female faces. And Hadza women like symmetry in men’s faces even more when they were pregnant or nursing, periods when they may be extra cautious about foods and disease harmful to a child.

In fact, even babies respond more positively to attractive, symmetrical faces. But babies appear to respond more to faces deemed attractive than those that are purely symmetrical, suggesting there’s something else going on.

There are theories that specific proportions are the most naturally beautiful, with ratios of length and width being important.

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And with the help of computers, it has become apparent that morphing a lot of faces together typically produces an end product that is highly attractive. The reasoning goes that this blending gets closer to the face “prototype” that may underline attractiveness — the ultimate idea of a face is the most average one.

So it may be that babies are drawn to faces that are most like the most basic concept of a face — that is, they are average.

Why should that matter? The theory goes that symmetrical features may be markers of genetic quality. Human ancestors evolved to find mates that would pass on good genes to offspring, so they would naturally be repelled by traits that would be detrimental to survival or indicators of poor health.

One study found that people with asymmetrical faces tended to come from more difficult and deprived childhoods than those with more symmetrical features. It appears that adversity in childhood is associated with facial features that are not perfectly aligned and matching, although there’s no proof that one of these phenomena causes the other.

And the kind of man that women are attracted to can vary according to phases of the ovulation cycle. Studies showed that during periods of high fertility, women are more drawn to more rugged, dominant-looking men. Subconsciously they may be perceiving beauty in accordance with evolutionary forces, since dominance can indicate genetic fitness. Incidentally, women also buy sexier clothes when they are most fertile.

A recent study found that women are most attracted to men with the strongest immune systems, which were associated with higher testosterone levels. But that was complicated in men who had higher levels of the stress hormone cortisol, suggesting that women may find stressed-out men less attractive.

Beauty also plays a role in friendship. Research has shown that women tend to have friends of similar attractiveness. These scientists found that, both in terms of one’s own perceptions of beauty and that of independent judges, a woman’s attractiveness correlates well with her friends’ attractiveness. And, if you’re a woman who’s the less attractive one in a friendship pair, you’re also more likely to view your more attractive friend as a mating rival. But this is a small study, and more research should be done to back up these conclusions.

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Beauty in yourself

Sometimes people hook their self-worth on their appearance, tying beauty to their perception of themselves. We compare how we think we look to how other people look, and we make a decision about whether we’re much better or much worse.

That comparison can have negative or positive emotional and psychological consequences.

There’s scientific evidence to suggest that ideas about the importance of one’s own beauty get formulated in childhood. Parents give a certain level of praise to their children for their appearance, vs. the amount of effort they put into tasks and the activities they’re good at. Little girls in child beauty contests, for instance, receive the feedback that their appearance is highly valued. You can imagine that sets the stage for people to think about themselves in terms of appearance or abilities.

And when it comes to assessing beauty, many people are their own worst critics. Sometimes there’s a particular body part that becomes a focus of self-loathing.

It’s still socially unacceptable to say things to others that we would say to ourselves. We don’t filter our judgments of ourselves in the same way that we filter judgments of others.

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When taken to the extreme, obsession over a particular aspect of one’s appearance has a psychiatric diagnosis: body dysmorphic disorder. It’s the reason some people get dozens of plastic surgeries, but are never satisfied with the outcomes.

On the flip side, you can view your body as a source of power — for instance, after running a first 5 kilometer race or even marathon, some people feel proud of what their bodies can do.

Beauty as power

Studies have shown that people who are perceived as being more attractive also appear more competent and successful. There’s presumably a strong cultural and learned dimension to all of these effects.

Other research has shown that physical attractiveness can also influence salary.

The legal system may even take beauty into account – a variety of studies have found effects suggesting that attractiveness helps when it comes to verdicts and sentencing. It may be that attractive people are less likely to commit crimes as serious as unattractive people, or that there is a societal view that pretty people are “good” and wouldn’t do bad things.

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Or we can divide perception of beauty into three things: contributing factors from genetics, grooming and how people reacted to your appearance in early life. Early experiences of being the apple of your mother or father’s eye goes a very long way about how you feel about your own looks. But if your parent became more critical of you when you became less “cute,” you might feel less attractive.

There must be something more than just other peoples’ good favor for looks going on, since there are professional models with low self-image.

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For models, there are unrealistic expectations of beauty all around — not only in magazines and television. The ones who do well are those who don’t assume they have to be perfect to be beautiful.

There’s a process that everyone goes through at some point, no matter how much or little you value your looks. The good looks of youth change, and no longer match your vision of yourself. But when you’re in a marriage or long-term partnership, you’re not actively having to worry about being beautiful to attract a new mate.

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Why do women wear makeup?

From the soot-rimmed eyes of the ancient Egyptians to the lead paint worn by the Elizabethans, women and girls have experimented with cosmetics throughout history. Indeed, according to the Roman playwright Plautus, “a woman without paint is like food without salt”. Shakespeare’s Hamlet was less keen but just as rude, telling Ophelia: “I’ve heard all about you women and your cosmetics too. God gives you one face, but you paint another on top of it…”.

photo-1530999651725-59e0e1761b3aSo is makeup necessary seasoning, a conniving ploy by manipulative sexpots, or neither? Ask a group of women why they wear makeup and you’ll receive myriad responses. Some will say it makes them feel more confident, that they don’t feel completely “done” without it; others will say they love experimenting with looks and colours as a way of expressing themselves, that there’s a fun, theatrical element to face paint that allows them to channel different personalities and aesthetics.

But just as there are women and girls who wear makeup completely for themselves, there are those who wear makeup for the perceived benefit of others, or who feel as though they are unacceptable without it. Makeup can be a mask you hide behind that gets you ready to face the world, or something you deploy as a weapon – to attract a partner, to intimidate, shock and amaze. It is used as part of religious or cultural rituals, or to align yourself with a subculture. It can mask your insecurities or be used to enhance the bits you love the most.

photo-1534420508552-1acd54331e78Makeup is so ubiquitous in our society that for a woman to go without it has become, in some cases, a statement – the “no makeup selfie” being a case in point. Makeup is especilly important for female celebrities that you can find on covers of many fashion magazines. Some will say there’s a fun, theatrical element to face paint that allows them to channel different personalities and aesthetics.

photo-1525641042653-e0caa0dffdd1Women receive messages from an early age that encourage us to believe that one of our primary functions is to be decorative and therefore appealing to men. Go into any newsagent and you’ll see little girls’ magazines that come with free gifts of lipgloss and nail varnish. Parents buy their daughters strange, disembodied dolls’ heads to practise on. The Disney princesses so many little girls model themselves on wear eyeliner, mascara and eyeshadow, and have perfectly plucked eyebrows. Considering the extent to which makeup is viewed as a process of adornment used for attracting a mate, to foist it upon girls so young is arguably more than a little creepy.

photo-1531475925016-6d33cb7c8344Evolutionary psychologists have it that, as with so many things, makeup comes down to sex. Women tend to have darker eyes and lips than men, and makeup enhances those sex differences. Furthermore, the desirable qualities a man looks for in a woman – largely related to reproductive fitness – are said to be amplified by makeup. Beauty ideals vary from culture to culture, but there are some universal markers of attractiveness. Facial symmetry and an even skin tone imply good health, while youthfulness denotes fertility. Plump lips and flushed cheeks, meanwhile, are signs of sexual arousal, so your scarlet lipstick and pink blusher might just be giving that random man in the bar the subconscious signal that you’re ready for a night of passion.

photo-1509251687257-cf2f5de0360aCosmetics companies often rely on women’s insecurities – inculcated through years of exposure to images of physical perfection in mainstream media – in order to sell products, operating on the basis of “maybe she’s born with it, but probably not, so buy this concealer”. Its function as a means for covering up unwanted flaws or “unsightly” blemishes is hammered into us again and again. Many women spend hundreds of pounds each year on cosmetics, and as many minutes worrying about the way we look.

When the vision of beauty you are presented with is largely homogeneous, it’s only natural that you might resort to makeup as an attempt to “blend in” or to “pass”. But, as often with trappings of femininity, you’re stuck between a rock and a hard place. Studies repeatedly tell us that men are more attracted to women who wear makeup.

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Perhaps, then, when it comes to makeup, we are our own worst enemies, believing that the world wants to see us in a certain way when in actual fact we’re fine the way we are. Why do women wear makeup? You could say it’s a pinch of patriarchy, a dusting of sex, a smattering of fun, and a whole, caked-on layer of misplaced insecurity.

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Beauty and success

Ah the beautiful woman. We all love to look at her, talk about her, wonder about her. She’s got it all, right? The great job, beautiful friends, a date every night, men falling over themselves to be noticed and doors being opened for her — both literally and figuratively.

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Okay, let’s face it. When we meet someone new a first impression is first about looks; only later do things such as personality, brains and character start to take on meaning. (A side note about beauty is that weight isn’t much of a factor, unless the person is morbidly obese or anorexically skinny. The key to perceived beauty is the face). It’s also found that beauty is connected with success – well, at least financial success.

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Companies that place a premium on hiring very attractive people had on average higher revenues than similar companies which did not. The public clearly rewards businesses with the beautiful faces. Most of people, regardless of their professed attitudes, prefer as customers to buy from better-looking salespeople, as jurors to listen to better-looking attorneys, as voters to be led by better-looking politicians, as students to learn from better-looking professors.

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Beautiful women have it even better and get away with things ordinary people can’t. Try talking an officer out of a ticket, or walking in without a reservation and getting a table at that hot new restaurant or talking that male co-worker into helping you move some furniture. Beauty does make a difference. Beautiful women get more smiles, more handsome lovers and better treatment, and perhaps they expect it. Sometimes the beautiful woman has a bigger-than-life persona; higher than normal self esteem coupled with the feeling that she is special and deserves the best can become a self fulfilling prophecy.

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The cycle is easy to see. The beautiful woman, constantly fawned upon, catered to, approached and presented with numerous options starts to see this as the norm. This sets up a powerful self image and expectations for the best. She starts expecting others to fawn, and expects things to be handed to her on a silver platter — a princess syndrome, of sorts. She is the center of attention, and everyone else is of little importance. The power of positive thinking at work.

So, it’s all good or not?

is the bomb and those lucky enough to have it are the equivalent of genetic lottery winners. Nope, all that glitters is not……..beautiful. As with most things, there’s a downside. Some would even say a dark side to beauty. How some beautiful women view themselves can border on obsessive. They cherish their looks and play them to the hilt, but if they find a blemish, a wrinkle or a flaw, it can throw them into a panic. It can even have them inquiring around for a good plastic surgeon, new dietician or workout guru.

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Low self esteem is more common in beautiful women than you ould expect. Some just don’t believe they are attractive. They have a distorted self image and don’t believe others who tell them how stunning they are. Thus in their mind everyone is a “liar” and not to be trusted. Some are dependent on the first impression reaction of others to define who they are, ie someone who has it all because of her beauty. So, she starts to see herself as someone with no talent, no intellect — no redeeming qualities other than her looks.

photo-1488751045188-3c55bbf9a3faThen there are the beauties that are truly shy, or to protect themselves from constant harassment, they withdraw. Unfortunately, they can come across as aloof, stuck up, snooty and even arrogant. If we take the time to get to know her instead of condemn her, we might find out she’s really kind, conscientious, caring… and perhaps just a little bit shy. It’s almost as if we’re subconsciously — or for some maybe even consciously — looking for a reason to treat her as less than a person.

If she’s beautiful, a new study says, there is often a hidden selfish streak. She’s lucky and she knows it, and she will consciously — or subconsciously — use her looks to her advantage any way she can.

Are beautiful women taken seriously? Research has shown that when women and men look at gorgeous women’s success, they immediately tend to credit their success to their looks, and not any talents or brains they may possess. Actually, beauty has both positive and negative effects on us. Chances are she’ll be taken more seriously by a male, but not by much. If she’s being scrutinized and considered by other women, then the highly attractive woman is at a big disadvantage.

Probably the most difficult thing a beautiful woman has to deal with is social rejection. When it comes to members of her own sex she is often an outcast. Whether it’s true or not, other women perceive the beauty as a threat to steal their man away. They may not trust their spouse/boyfriend/lover in the presence of such beauty, and simply prefer to reject her instead.

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Meanwhile the men think what the heck, what chance do I have with a woman like that? All too often folks think she has it all, and she must already be taken. Plus, what chance would the average man have anyway? She can have anyone she wants, someone with money, fame and looks. In essence, the men are intimidated and prefer to stare from afar rather than approach.

Another study shows it isn’t cheap to be a beautiful woman. They spend about one third of their income on maintaining those good looks. I’m all for taking care of yourself and trying to look your best. But, many of these women are spending money they don’t have on creams, diets, products and cosmetic surgery. High fashion magazines feel they need to “Photoshop” even the most gorgeous of models, so does that put even more pressure on the beautiful woman to keep up appearances? After all, in her mind that may be all she has going for her, thus money is no object when it buys self esteem.

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So, there is good and bad with beauty and the real question is what exactly determines which woman will parlay it into success and which will succumb to the dark side? The answer is quite simple. Beauty is an asset, just like physical prowess, charisma, brains or emotional intelligence. The key with any gift is in the way that you use it. It doesn’t define you as a person. Rather, it’s an asset to be used judiciously and with an understanding of how it is just a small part of who you are. Those that get this will do well; others that don’t, not so much.

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As with most things beauty can be a blessing, but it can also be a curse. Very often beautiful women like to say that they are intrigued by the way in which physical appearance can often direct a person’s life; things happen differently for a beautiful woman than for a plain one. Different yes, but not necessarily better. So, the next time you see a stunningly beautiful woman,…. enjoy the view, but don’t judge her because she’s beautiful.

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